Articles Posted in Car Accidents

The public generally associates impaired driving accidents with negligent drivers operating their vehicles under the influence of alcohol. However, many New Hampshire accidents involve drivers impaired by prescription medications. While prescription medications may be necessary for individuals to function and remain healthy, these medications can also cause significant impairment to the user.

Many prescription medications cause the user to have a slower reaction time because of drowsiness or confusion. Although medications typically have warnings on their bottles, many users fail to review the warnings or abide by them. Moreover, even when the user takes the medication as prescribed, they may still experience adverse or unexpected side effects. These side effects generally occur when the user mixes medications or uses alcohol with the medication.

Prescription and illicit medications can impair a person’s ability to make educated and safe decisions while driving. Further, the person may experience diminished control over their gross motor skills. This combination can be deadly to the driver and anyone in their path. For example, local news reports described a fatal New Hampshire crash. A 66-year-old Maine woman admitted that she took nerve and heart medication the morning of the accident and drank three glasses of wine. She also consumed a THC gummy the night before.

New Hampshire accident victims may incur sizeable financial losses related to the incident. In these situations, the victim may pursue compensation against the at-fault party for lost wages, medical expenses, pain and suffering, and similar losses. While many cases settle, a significant number of cases proceed to litigation. Even if the plaintiff is successful at trial, the challenges do not necessarily end. In many cases, defendants do not have the means to pay the judgment. It is vital that accident victims consult with an attorney to determine a viable way to recover compensation.

After a favorable judgment, the defendant should voluntarily and promptly pay the judgment. However, if the defendant fails to do so, the plaintiff has various methods for collecting the judgment or settlement amount. Recovering compensation is a complex process, and each form of recovery depends on the defendant’s unique circumstances. However, generally, New Hampshire plaintiffs can garnish the defendant’s wages. In some cases, the court will garnish a portion of the defendant’s wage towards the judgment amount. However, if the defendant is low income and surviving on government assistance, the court will not garnish those payments.

Next, a court may place a levy on the defendant’s property, such as their bank accounts, real estate investments, and vehicles. The plaintiff needs to record their judgment with the appropriate government entity to ensure that all or part of the proceeds will go to the judgment if the property is sold. Further, this applies to certain businesses the defendants own. The income from the business or proceeds from a sale may go to the plaintiff’s judgment. Finally, the defendant’s future or income may go towards the judgments. Moreover, New Hampshire’s uninsured and underinsured motorist laws may work in the plaintiff’s favor.

While most New Hampshire car accidents are between two cars, some accidents involve many vehicles. These multi-vehicle collisions are sometimes unavoidable for motorists who are suddenly confronted with a hazard, such as another vehicle that spins out of control or an unexpected pile-up occurring right in front of them. Often, multi-vehicle accidents are considered “chain reaction” car accidents.

A chain-reaction car accident is one in which an accident between two or more vehicles creates an unavoidable hazard for other motorists, who then end up getting into subsequent collisions. These accidents often occur on busy roads and highways. For example, in a recent New Hampshire chain-reaction car accident, four people were taken to the hospital with serious injuries.

According to a local news report, the accident occurred on Interstate 93 near the Hooksett tolls. While details surrounding the accident are sparse, authorities noted that the collision involved three passenger vehicles and a semi-truck.

Car accidents involving property damage are a common occurrence in New Hampshire. While some degree of property damage is an unfortunate consequence of many accidents, people do not expect a vehicle to barrel through and destroy their homes. Although it is rare, this can occur, especially when a home is close to a major roadway or intersection. On top of sheer shock, these accidents can result in severe property damage and injuries to the home’s occupants.

There are many reasons why a vehicle may slam into a house or fixture on a person’s property. Although most accidents are unexpected, they are usually avoidable and often involve some degree of negligence. Typically accidents involving a car running into the home occur because of driver fatigue, a medical event, a hazardous roadway, vehicle malfunction, or an impaired driver. On top of property damage that may exceed tens of thousands of dollars, the home’s occupants and bystanders may suffer serious or fatal injuries.

For instance, local news reports described a horrifying incident when a man crashed into a New Hampshire home. The driver was speeding in his SUV when he slammed into a mailbox and crashed into the home before finally coming to a rest after hitting a tree. The homeowner explained that they were sitting in their home when he saw his front glass door fly across the room. The driver slammed into a granite mailbox, which fell on the hood of his SUV and catapulted the vehicle straight into the home and then a tree. The father quickly ran to his young son and daughter, who were playing in the front room, where his son told him that he thought the house blew up and his sister was dead. The father grabbed his daughter and ran outside for help. The daughter was airlifted to a Boston hospital for emergency surgery. Authorities believe that speeding and intoxication contributed to the driver’s conduct. The man has been charged with driving while intoxicated, first-degree assault, and three counts of reckless conduct with a deadly weapon.

Car accidents can be very stressful experiences, especially when they result in serious, potentially lifelong injuries. Cases involving drivers under the influence of drugs or alcohol tend to result in serious injuries and are more likely to cause a fatality. As such, New Hampshire drunk driving cases often leave victims with significant medical expenses and other losses. While drunk drivers can face criminal charges, including incarceration and fines, they may also face liability under the civil justice system through a personal injury lawsuit filed by the accident victim.

These accidents often result in serious injuries involving brain and spinal cord trauma, paralysis, lacerations, organ damage, and psychological distress. The impact of these accidents can be long-lasting and require ongoing medical treatment. While insurance may cover part of these expenses, the coverage is often inadequate. This can leave victims and their families to experience additional trauma. For instance, recent reports described a New Hampshire drunk driving accident that took the life of a New Jersey man. A 66-year-old Maine woman was driving northbound when she hit a minivan, crossed into the median, and hit a southbound Jeep. The 27-year old Jeep driver was ejected from the car and later died from his injuries. The 66-year-old woman suffered severe injuries and is facing charges for aggravated driving while under the influence.

In cases like this, the victim’s family or estate may file a claim under New Hampshire’s negligence per se laws. Negligence per se is a doctrine where a person’s conduct is negligent because it violates a statute that the law is intended to protect again. In New Hampshire, negligence per se only applies to alcohol-related claims. In this context, it means that evidence of the at-fault party’s intoxication is enough to establish negligence. In contrast, in typical personal injury cases, victims must establish that the defendant’s conduct was not reasonable. As such, a person who operates a vehicle with a blood alcohol concentration over the legal limit will be negligent per se.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reports that nearly 15,000 backing-out accidents occur every year on United States roadways. These accidents account for approximately 30,000 injuries. While many people categorize these accidents as “fender benders,” these accidents can result in serious injuries and property damage. New Hampshire backing-up accidents can result in whiplash, broken bones, spinal cord damage, and bruising. Backing up accidents involving large vehicles, such as trucks, may even result in traumatic brain injuries and death.

For example, local news reports described a New Hampshire tractor-trailer accident that resulted in serious injuries. State Police reported that the tractor-trailer driver was returning home after making a run. While he was backing into his driveway, the driver stated that he did not see the other truck until moments before the other driver struck his trailer. The impact caused the trailer to split in two and detach from the cab. Emergency responders had to call excavators to clear the vehicles from the road. Both drivers suffered serious injuries and received treatment at the hospital.

After a backing-up accident, many people presume that the driver backing up was at fault. However, that is not always the case, and these cases require plaintiffs to present compelling evidence of fault and liability. There are two preliminary inquiries in these cases: first, which motorist had the right of way, and whether the vehicle was moving.

Driver negligence is the cause of a significant number of head-on New Hampshire accidents. Every year thousands of people suffer life-altering injuries and death because of these types of collisions. For instance, a recent news report described a harrowing New Hampshire head-on accident. Hooksett firefighters and police received calls reporting a box truck and car collision. An initial investigation revealed that while making a sharp curve, the sedan crossed into the lane that the truck was traveling in. The collision required two ambulances to transport all of the victims to a local hospital for emergency treatment.

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reports that motor vehicle accidents are the leading cause of death for children, teens, and young adults. Head-on collisions account for a significant number of these accidents. These accidents typically result in serious injuries that require lengthy and extensive medical treatment.

After a New Hampshire accident, injury victims and their families may recover compensation for their damages. These lawsuits require the claimant to establish that the negligent driver owed the victim a duty, they breached that duty by acting negligently, and that negligence conduct caused the plaintiff’s injuries. Although the claims seem straightforward, there are various defenses that insurance companies and defendants will purport to avoid compensating the victim. In addition to the substantive defenses, plaintiffs often face complex and daunting procedural barriers that make pursuing a claim difficult.

There are few experiences as harrowing as losing a loved one to a preventable accident. When this occurs, the accident victim’s family may be able to recover damages against the negligent party. This includes individuals, businesses, and even government entities. New Hampshire’s wrongful death statute governs situations when death results from another’s careless, negligent or wrongful act. Wrongful death claims are similar to personal injury claims, except they are filed on behalf of the deceased person. These claims can proceed regardless of whether there are any criminal charges brought against the negligent party.

Wrongful death lawsuits often stem from motor vehicle accidents, incidents of medical, and other situations where someone’s negligence causes another’s injury. For instance, recently, a new source described the tragic death of a 15-year-old girl in a New Hampshire car accident. The girl was a passenger in a Toyota whose 17-year-old driver lost control and crossed into oncoming traffic. An oncoming vehicle struck the Toyota, and the girl was taken to the hospital with life-threatening injuries. The 17-year-old was taken to the hospital with serious injuries, and the 15-year-old girl later died at the hospital.

An accident victim’s living relatives or beneficiaries may be able to file a wrongful death claim. However, under New Hampshire’s wrongful death statute § 556.19, anyone with a legal interest in the victim’s estate may file a claim. Nevertheless, parties must abide by the state’s statute of limitations to ensure that the court will hear their claim. Generally, New Hampshire wrongful death cases must be filed within three years from the date of death. However, it is essential that claimants contact an attorney as soon as possible. These cases often require an in-depth investigation and analysis to ensure that the claimants recover what they deserve.

Car accidents can take place in a variety of ways. From the regular fender bender to a T-bone collision, collisions can vary in severity as well. When it comes to head-on crashes, however, the outcome is almost always deadly. When two cars driving at high speeds crash directly into each other from opposite directions, the results can be devastating. Thus, when these accidents take place, those who are responsible must be held accountable.

According to a local news report, two drivers died after a head-on crash took place in Merrimack, New Hampshire. A Honda and an Audi crashed into each other directly from opposite directions and both drivers were pronounced dead on the scene. When local authorities arrived, one of the vehicles was engulfed in flames. Following the accident, the roadway was shut down for two hours and the accident blocked all three travel lanes. There were no witnesses to the events leading up to the crash, so the accident remains under investigation to determine the cause.

In New Hampshire, when these deadly accidents take place and you lose a loved one in the process, filing a lawsuit or a claim against the responsible party may be the furthest thing from your mind. New Hampshire laws, however, provide that a wrongful death claim can be filed when the at-fault party committed a negligent, reckless, or intentional act and it resulted in another person’s death. Wrongful death claims are considered civil claims analogous to personal injury claims. When you bring a claim on behalf of the deceased individual, you may be eligible for compensation.

When our loved ones are taken from us too soon because of an accident, it can be one of the most painful things that we experience in life. From a practical standpoint, the loss of a family member could mean that a family’s primary source of income or financial support is also significantly impacted. Thus, when an accident in New Hampshire takes place and was caused by the wrongful act of another and results in death, those who are responsible must be held accountable for their actions.

According to a recent news report, a three-car collision left two killed and one injured in Lee on Route 125. Lee police reported that one of the drivers was driving north on Route 125 when he veered into the southbound lane and hit another car head-on. The driver then crashed into another southbound car that swerved out of the way to avoid the initial accident but was not injured. The at-fault driver was transported to a local hospital, where he died from his injuries. The driver of the car that the at-fault vehicle crashed into head-on was pronounced dead at the scene, and his passenger was taken to the hospital to be treated for her injuries.

In New Hampshire, wrongful death claims can be brought by the administrator of the deceased’s estate against the at-fault party. A number of different kinds of compensatory damages are available, including payment for medical bills and expenses and pain and suffering.

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