Articles Posted in Car Accidents

Car accidents can be very stressful experiences, especially when they result in serious, potentially lifelong injuries. Cases involving drivers under the influence of drugs or alcohol tend to result in serious injuries and are more likely to cause a fatality. As such, New Hampshire drunk driving cases often leave victims with significant medical expenses and other losses. While drunk drivers can face criminal charges, including incarceration and fines, they may also face liability under the civil justice system through a personal injury lawsuit filed by the accident victim.

These accidents often result in serious injuries involving brain and spinal cord trauma, paralysis, lacerations, organ damage, and psychological distress. The impact of these accidents can be long-lasting and require ongoing medical treatment. While insurance may cover part of these expenses, the coverage is often inadequate. This can leave victims and their families to experience additional trauma. For instance, recent reports described a New Hampshire drunk driving accident that took the life of a New Jersey man. A 66-year-old Maine woman was driving northbound when she hit a minivan, crossed into the median, and hit a southbound Jeep. The 27-year old Jeep driver was ejected from the car and later died from his injuries. The 66-year-old woman suffered severe injuries and is facing charges for aggravated driving while under the influence.

In cases like this, the victim’s family or estate may file a claim under New Hampshire’s negligence per se laws. Negligence per se is a doctrine where a person’s conduct is negligent because it violates a statute that the law is intended to protect again. In New Hampshire, negligence per se only applies to alcohol-related claims. In this context, it means that evidence of the at-fault party’s intoxication is enough to establish negligence. In contrast, in typical personal injury cases, victims must establish that the defendant’s conduct was not reasonable. As such, a person who operates a vehicle with a blood alcohol concentration over the legal limit will be negligent per se.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reports that nearly 15,000 backing-out accidents occur every year on United States roadways. These accidents account for approximately 30,000 injuries. While many people categorize these accidents as “fender benders,” these accidents can result in serious injuries and property damage. New Hampshire backing-up accidents can result in whiplash, broken bones, spinal cord damage, and bruising. Backing up accidents involving large vehicles, such as trucks, may even result in traumatic brain injuries and death.

For example, local news reports described a New Hampshire tractor-trailer accident that resulted in serious injuries. State Police reported that the tractor-trailer driver was returning home after making a run. While he was backing into his driveway, the driver stated that he did not see the other truck until moments before the other driver struck his trailer. The impact caused the trailer to split in two and detach from the cab. Emergency responders had to call excavators to clear the vehicles from the road. Both drivers suffered serious injuries and received treatment at the hospital.

After a backing-up accident, many people presume that the driver backing up was at fault. However, that is not always the case, and these cases require plaintiffs to present compelling evidence of fault and liability. There are two preliminary inquiries in these cases: first, which motorist had the right of way, and whether the vehicle was moving.

Driver negligence is the cause of a significant number of head-on New Hampshire accidents. Every year thousands of people suffer life-altering injuries and death because of these types of collisions. For instance, a recent news report described a harrowing New Hampshire head-on accident. Hooksett firefighters and police received calls reporting a box truck and car collision. An initial investigation revealed that while making a sharp curve, the sedan crossed into the lane that the truck was traveling in. The collision required two ambulances to transport all of the victims to a local hospital for emergency treatment.

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reports that motor vehicle accidents are the leading cause of death for children, teens, and young adults. Head-on collisions account for a significant number of these accidents. These accidents typically result in serious injuries that require lengthy and extensive medical treatment.

After a New Hampshire accident, injury victims and their families may recover compensation for their damages. These lawsuits require the claimant to establish that the negligent driver owed the victim a duty, they breached that duty by acting negligently, and that negligence conduct caused the plaintiff’s injuries. Although the claims seem straightforward, there are various defenses that insurance companies and defendants will purport to avoid compensating the victim. In addition to the substantive defenses, plaintiffs often face complex and daunting procedural barriers that make pursuing a claim difficult.

There are few experiences as harrowing as losing a loved one to a preventable accident. When this occurs, the accident victim’s family may be able to recover damages against the negligent party. This includes individuals, businesses, and even government entities. New Hampshire’s wrongful death statute governs situations when death results from another’s careless, negligent or wrongful act. Wrongful death claims are similar to personal injury claims, except they are filed on behalf of the deceased person. These claims can proceed regardless of whether there are any criminal charges brought against the negligent party.

Wrongful death lawsuits often stem from motor vehicle accidents, incidents of medical, and other situations where someone’s negligence causes another’s injury. For instance, recently, a new source described the tragic death of a 15-year-old girl in a New Hampshire car accident. The girl was a passenger in a Toyota whose 17-year-old driver lost control and crossed into oncoming traffic. An oncoming vehicle struck the Toyota, and the girl was taken to the hospital with life-threatening injuries. The 17-year-old was taken to the hospital with serious injuries, and the 15-year-old girl later died at the hospital.

An accident victim’s living relatives or beneficiaries may be able to file a wrongful death claim. However, under New Hampshire’s wrongful death statute § 556.19, anyone with a legal interest in the victim’s estate may file a claim. Nevertheless, parties must abide by the state’s statute of limitations to ensure that the court will hear their claim. Generally, New Hampshire wrongful death cases must be filed within three years from the date of death. However, it is essential that claimants contact an attorney as soon as possible. These cases often require an in-depth investigation and analysis to ensure that the claimants recover what they deserve.

Car accidents can take place in a variety of ways. From the regular fender bender to a T-bone collision, collisions can vary in severity as well. When it comes to head-on crashes, however, the outcome is almost always deadly. When two cars driving at high speeds crash directly into each other from opposite directions, the results can be devastating. Thus, when these accidents take place, those who are responsible must be held accountable.

According to a local news report, two drivers died after a head-on crash took place in Merrimack, New Hampshire. A Honda and an Audi crashed into each other directly from opposite directions and both drivers were pronounced dead on the scene. When local authorities arrived, one of the vehicles was engulfed in flames. Following the accident, the roadway was shut down for two hours and the accident blocked all three travel lanes. There were no witnesses to the events leading up to the crash, so the accident remains under investigation to determine the cause.

In New Hampshire, when these deadly accidents take place and you lose a loved one in the process, filing a lawsuit or a claim against the responsible party may be the furthest thing from your mind. New Hampshire laws, however, provide that a wrongful death claim can be filed when the at-fault party committed a negligent, reckless, or intentional act and it resulted in another person’s death. Wrongful death claims are considered civil claims analogous to personal injury claims. When you bring a claim on behalf of the deceased individual, you may be eligible for compensation.

When our loved ones are taken from us too soon because of an accident, it can be one of the most painful things that we experience in life. From a practical standpoint, the loss of a family member could mean that a family’s primary source of income or financial support is also significantly impacted. Thus, when an accident in New Hampshire takes place and was caused by the wrongful act of another and results in death, those who are responsible must be held accountable for their actions.

According to a recent news report, a three-car collision left two killed and one injured in Lee on Route 125. Lee police reported that one of the drivers was driving north on Route 125 when he veered into the southbound lane and hit another car head-on. The driver then crashed into another southbound car that swerved out of the way to avoid the initial accident but was not injured. The at-fault driver was transported to a local hospital, where he died from his injuries. The driver of the car that the at-fault vehicle crashed into head-on was pronounced dead at the scene, and his passenger was taken to the hospital to be treated for her injuries.

In New Hampshire, wrongful death claims can be brought by the administrator of the deceased’s estate against the at-fault party. A number of different kinds of compensatory damages are available, including payment for medical bills and expenses and pain and suffering.

New Hampshire state laws and federal laws maintain several statutes relevant to victim’s rights and compensation after an injury. However, in the criminal trial process, New Hampshire’s victims’ compensation program rarely provides victims and families with the financial assistance they require after an injury or accident. Although no amount of money can ever fully compensate a victim or their loved one after a serious accident, the state’s civil compensation laws can help a New Hampshire accident victim work towards becoming whole again.

After an accident, a New Hampshire injury victim can recover general and economic damages. Damages usually involve losses related to medical expenses, lost wages, and property damage. General damages refer to intangible losses that result because of another’s negligence. These damages typically include losses related to emotional distress, pain and suffering, scarring and disfigurement, permanent physical disabilities, and reduced quality of life. In contrast, economic damages are tangible losses related to the costs associated with home or personal care, past and prospective medical expenses, loss of wages, and reduced lifelong earning capacity.

Many states maintain punitive damages statutes that work to compensate victims in cases where the defendant acted with malice or egregiously. New Hampshire courts have a long-standing history of refusing to award punitive damages, and essentially outlawed these damages in 2015. In addressing the public’s concern that there are situations where these awards are necessary, the state offers enhanced compensatory damages instead of punitive damages. The doctrine allows courts to award supplemental or enhanced damages when the defendant’s conduct was “wanton, malicious, or oppressive.” These damages undergo a detailed case-by-case analysis, and plaintiffs should retain an attorney to ensure that they appropriately present a compelling case for enhanced compensatory damages.

New Hampshire car accidents can happen for a wide variety of reasons. Whether it’s poor weather conditions, reduced visibility, negligent or reckless driving by another party, or mechanical failure, the possibilities are endless. One of the most dangerous and potentially fatal accidents, however, are wrong-way accidents. When these collisions take place, there is a high likelihood of serious injury or death because of the nature of the accident.

According to a recent news article, two people were injured following a wrong-way car accident. Evidently, a driver entered the freeway southbound at an exit to a northbound freeway and crashed head-on into a Toyota Camry that was traveling northbound in the correct direction. When local authorities arrived on the scene, both vehicles had heavy front-end damage, with the at-fault party’s car facing south in the northbound lane. Following the collision, both drivers were transported to local hospitals and their injuries were reportedly not considered life-threatening. Both vehicles were towed from the scene, and for a short period of time, all northbound traffic was closed. The collision remains under investigation by local authorities.

Based on data from the Department of Transportation, wrong-way driving accidents account for between 300 to 400 deaths in the United States each year, with many more injured from these collisions. Although they may be less common compared to other types of accidents, they are often fatal, and more than 60 percent occur because of drunk driving or operating a vehicle while under the influence of drugs.

New Hampshire car accidents happen for all kinds of reasons every year—negligence, distracted driving, illicit substances, and bad weather conditions, are only a few examples. An unexpectedly dangerous and common cause of car accidents, however, has also claimed hundreds of lives: drowsy driving has consistently been a significant cause of car accidents and is more common than you think—and could also affect anyone behind the wheel.

According to statistics from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), drowsy driving has claimed 795 lives in 2017 alone. Between 2013 and 2017, 4,111 fatalities were recorded that were associated with drowsy driving. When evaluating general motor vehicle crashes involving drowsy driving, 91,000 collisions were recorded in 2017.

Fatigue, which often results in drowsy driving, affects millions of Americans on a daily basis. Whether it is caused by a poor night of sleep, a late shift, or just pure exhaustion, fatigue can be costly and result in negative outcomes. When you operate a vehicle and become drowsy or were drowsy when you got in the car, the consequences can be disastrous. According to NHTSA, fatigue most frequently results in impaired cognition, car crashes, and other significant health-related consequences.

Sometimes, car accidents only involve two parties—an at-fault party, and the party who was harmed as the result of the accident. Not all accidents, however, are this simple. When an initial collision leads to accidents that take place after it, it is often referred to as a chain reaction accident. Chain reaction accidents often involve three or more cars and are usually complex cases because multiple parties and their negligence may have caused you to suffer property damage or injuries.

These chain reaction accidents often occur more frequently than you may expect. According to a recent news article, local authorities found a vehicle rolled over on its roof with a woman trapped inside after she crashed into a guardrail and her car slid into the travel portion of the highway. Shortly after the initial accident, there was a two-vehicle crash just south of the initial collision. No one was injured in the second accident, but the woman involved in the first was transported to a local hospital to be treated.

In New Hampshire, in a case like this one, the dispute will primarily be over who should assume more responsibility in causing the second accident—the original initial accident where the woman crashed into the guardrail, or the primary at-fault party in the second accident. For example, the responsible party in the second accident could argue that the crash would not have occurred if the initial accident did not take place ahead and resulted in an increase in traffic. Because of the initial driver’s negligence, the second driver could argue that the initial driver should bear some level of responsibility in the second accident coming to fruition.

Contact Information